Week In Fabric :: 11 October 2017

What's Inspiring Us From The Global Material Landscape


H&M Invests In Breakthrough Technology For Textile Recycling

Recycling textiles is hard, primarily because most clothes are made from blended fibers which are difficult to sort and reconstruct into pure cotton, wool or silk for example. This week, fast fashion giant H&M made a major development in creating new technology to successfully recycle textiles into high-quality raw materials.    

Recycling textiles is hard, primarily because most clothes are made from blended fibers which are difficult to sort and reconstruct into pure cotton, wool or silk for example. This week, fast fashion giant H&M made a major development in creating new technology to successfully recycle textiles into high-quality raw materials.  

 

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Fashion Tech Lab Unveils The Materials of The Future in Paris

Fashion luminaries from Stella McCartney to Diane Von Furstenburg gathered at Google’s Paris Arts & Culture Center to see what the future of material innovation had in store for luxury brands of the future. 

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Japanese Fabrics and Inspiration Take Center Stage at Milan Fashion Week

It’s no secret that we love Japanese fabrics here at Le Souk. As such, we were crushing on Gabriele Colangelo’s showing at Milan Fashion Week which truly showcased Japanese textiles in their finest form. 

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Raymond, The Premier Indian Mill, Launches Handspun Khadi

One of India’s premier mills, Raymond, together with the global authority on merino wool, launched an exclusive collection of handspun wool created by clusters of artisans across the country. The collaboration promotes the best of Made in Australia & Made in India. 

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Meet The Australian Couple Who’s Keeping The Cashmere Textile Industry Alive

The textile supply chain is convoluted, and while much of the raw wool we wear comes from Australia & New Zealand, very little of the fabric is actually made in those countries. That’s because the raw wool lint is exported to markets like Italy & China for spinning and weaving. This article highlights one Australian couple who’s keeping the cashmere industry alive - from lint to fabric - in Australia. 

 

Week In FabricBenita Singh