Supplier Spotlight: Panchachuli U.K.

 
 Women Weavers of Kumaon. Courtesy of Panchachuli

Women Weavers of Kumaon. Courtesy of Panchachuli

Panchachuli UK has social and ecological principles at the very heart of their business. The Pashmina Cashmere wool is hand-spun, knitted, woven and dyed by Panchachuli women of Kumaon. From raw materials to end product, the process is entirely in the hands of the people. They are industrial leaders in sustainability - master craftsmen at producing pashmina cashmere wool. 

In 1997 Mukti Datta and Dena Kaye created Panchachuli Women Weavers in order to better the lives of the women from the Kumoan Region. They set up a training program to teach the women how to weave. Later in 2005 The Panchachuli Women Weavers Co-operation was founded. They were able to trade in cashmina due to the re-opening of a Tibetan trade route in 1995, that had been closed due to the Indo-China war. By reviving the regions lost art of handloom weaving, it has become a self-sufficient and vibrant social enterprise, owned and managed by over 800 local women.

 Lambs Wool Hand Woven Houndstooth Tweed

Lambs Wool Hand Woven Houndstooth Tweed

 Lambs Wool Tweed Check

Lambs Wool Tweed Check

The pashmina cashmere wool is collected by Panchachuli women on an annual arduous trek to Tibet, or through the harvesting of oak silk and nettles by local villagers. Separated by hand, the wool is hand-spun using either tradition takli or the ‘Ghandi Spinning Wheel’ methods. The New Zealand lambswool is imported in hanks and dyed. This dye is made from indigenous flowers, leaves, bark and roots. They use ISO/AZO free dyes as well as water-based dyes for all printing processes. Indigo is the only exception, which comes from a community in Southern Indian. 

World-renowned for their ethical approach and community spirit, Panchachuli produces the highest quality pashmina cashmere wool. The sole source of income for most of the women are from Panchachuli products, and the local community reaps the benefits as a result. Everyday Panchachuli is preserving these ancient communities, whilst advancing the woman's quality of life.